Lineages, Inc.

While very few American frontiersmen married a “Cherokee Princess”, thousands wed Native Americans before 1906. If you’ve heard stories about a Cherokee ancestor somewhere in your family tree and want to claim your Native American heritage by becoming a member of the tribe, you’ll have to prove it to the Bureau of Indian Affairs and the Cherokee Nation. Only after your application has been accepted will you become eligible to receive the benefits of tribal membership.

To be eligible for Tribal Membership with the Cherokee Nation, you must apply and be able to present a Certificate of Degree of Indian Blood (CDIB) issued by the Bureau of Indian Affairs. You must apply for a CDIB and provide acceptable legal documents that connect you to an ancestor whose name appears with a roll number and blood degree from the Final Rolls of Citizens and Freedmen of the Five Civilized Tribes-Cherokee Nation (commonly called the Dawes Commission Rolls or Final Rolls). These rolls were compiled between 1899 and 1906. Quantum of Indian blood must be computed from the nearest paternal and/or maternal direct ancestor(s) of Indian blood listed on the Final Rolls. Many descendants of Cherokee Indians cannot be certified, nor can they qualify for tribal membership in the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma, because their ancestors were not enrolled during the final enrollment. The requirements at that time were:

  1. Apply between 1899 and 1906.
  2. Appear on previous tribal rolls compiled in 1880 or 1896.
  3. Have a permanent residence within the Cherokee Nation (now the 14 northeastern counties of Oklahoma).

If ancestors had separated from the Tribe and settled in states such as Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, and Texas, they lost citizenship within the Cherokee Nation. Only enrolled members of the Cherokee Nation named on the Final Rolls and/or their direct descendants can be granted a Certificate of Degree of Indian Blood and/or Tribal Membership. CDIB’s are issued only through the natural parents. In cases of adoption, quantum of Indian blood must be proven through the biological parents to the enrolled ancestor. A copy of the Final Decree of Adoption must accompany the application for CDIB, as well as the State Certified, full image/photocopy of the birth record.

It will take a professional genealogist at Lineages, Inc. a minimum of 10 to 15 hours to determine if one of your ancestors was a member of the Cherokee Tribe.  For more information see http://www.lineages.com/native-american-research/.

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57 Responses

  1. where can you get the blood quantum test i have called so labs and no one can help me

  2. Hi, thank you for your question! A blood quantum is not actually a test of your blood. Historically, blood quantum referred to the fraction of Native American blood assigned to someone based on whether their parents, and grandparents were full-blooded, half-blooded and so on. In order to get a Certificate of Degree of Indian Blood mentioned above, you would have to know the name of an Indigenous ancestor who was on the official rolls of the tribe. Then you would have to call the local Bureau of Indian Affairs agency to figure out what legal documents you would need to submit in order to get the certificate. If you do know an ancestor who was on the rolls but not a local BIA agency, call the Office of Indian Services and explain the situation. They should be able to tell you which BIA agency to submit the request to. If you do not know an ancestor on the official rolls of the tribe, you will have to do some research to figure that out. Unfortunately, there is no lab test that can be taken that will help in this process, it is all based on legal documents.
    Forrest Emmett

  3. I am a registered cherokee Indian. I have five children. I want to register them as well. But I live in Missouri so there isnt any reservations or cherokee nations anywhere I can go too be able to do it. And when I call the number to get instructions I always get a busy signal. Do u have Amy advice? Is there anything online?

  4. Hi, thank you for your question. If you are enrolled in the Cherokee Nation in Oklahoma, they have a website with instructions and with some contact information. https://www.cherokee.org/all-services/tribal-registration/.
    I would recommend calling or emailing the Tribal Registration services and asking how you should proceed. If you look under “downloadable forms” they have the instructions for the different forms you would need to fill out in order to apply. They include instructions for what enrolled parents need to do to enroll their children. If you are a member of one of the other Cherokee tribes, you can reply to this post with which tribe you are enrolled in and we can try to help more specifically.

  5. Im 67 o negative rh factor,my dad and his family are cherokee,they loved in Nort Carolina,I dont know how to go about doing this,plz help

  6. Hi,
    Thank you for your question. If you are interested in membership in a Cherokee tribe, there are a couple things to consider. In North Carolina, there is the Eastern Band of Cherokee. They have a description of how to enroll in their tribe on this webpage: https://ebci.com/enrollment/. Essentially, you have to have at least one ancestor who is on the document called the “1924 Baker Roll.” If you know who your Cherokee ancestors were in 1924, you should contact the Eastern Band of Cherokee’s enrollment office and get further instructions. If your Cherokee ancestors moved to North Carolina in recent times, it is possible that your ancestors were technically a part of the Cherokee Nation in Oklahoma and you would have to apply there. Each of the Cherokee bands/nations have fairly specific enrollment requirements. So it is important go to their websites and follow their instructions. If you are interested in having research done to find information on your Cherokee ancestors, we would be happy to assist.

  7. My family is from Nowata Oklahoma. I am some % of Native American from my dna test and have been told all my life I’m part Cherokee. I do not know any ancestors though. I don’t know how to go about this.

  8. Hi, thank you for your comment. If your family has been in Oklahoma for many years it is likely that any Native American heritage would be from the five tribes there. If your goal is simply to identify whether you have Native American heritage, then there is no specific method other than doing general research on all the lines in your family until you find an ancestor who was Native American. If you are hoping to apply for membership in one of the five tribes there are a number of requirements to be aware of. However, before anything else, you would want to see if any of your ancestors born before the 1890s were ever on the Dawes Rolls. You can look them up on websites like Ancestry.com, FamilySearch.org, or AccessGenealogy.com. If you are interested in having us research your lines for you, we would be happy to assist.

  9. Hello, I have a question:

    My great great great grandmother’s name does appear on the Dawes roll as full blooded Cherokee Indian and her daughter, my great great grandmother name also appears on the Dawes roll as 1/2 blooded Cherokee Indian. Weird how they were strict on recording that kind of stuff, lol. Anyway, Is it ok if I apply for my CIBD using the one listed with being 1/2 blooded since that will probably require less birth/death records. Her son who would be 1/4 and so forth, are not listed. Just some cousins and other relatives are also shown on these Dawes rolls.

    Btw, I also already have records of at least four descendants leading up to that great great grandmother. Ex. my grandmother, my great grandfather record, my great grandmother record and finally the great great grandmother with 1/2 blood for Cherokee record as well. Do you think this will be sufficient to get my CBID card or do you suggest I look up more records leading to full blooded Cherokee ancestor or what else is needed. Do I also need to provide all of their death records? or will their Dawes roll numbers be enough, too?
    While these relatives all born or lived in Oklahoma at one time, some moved throughout the western/southwestern does that make a difference?

  10. Hi, thank you for your question! The application requirements are fairly specific. We recommend looking up the CIBD application packet on the Cherokee Nation’s website. Go to https://www.cherokee.org/all-services/tribal-registration/, click on downloadable forms and print out the “Cherokee Nation CIDB Application Packet.” You will want to read it very carefully. Also, consider calling the Tribal enrollment office, just to double check that you got to the right form. You never know when an online form might have become outdated.
    Based on the instructions, you only need to have concrete proof back to an enrolled ancestor with a citizenship number. So if your mother, grandmother, or great-grandmother ever was a citizen of the Cherokee nation, you only need to document back to them. Likely you will still want to provide the name of your “original enrollee” and their dawes number, but you should probably be okay with just your great-great grandmother with 1/2 blood quantum as the original enrollee.
    The Application packet states that you have to have your birth certificate and either birth or death certificates for each person back to the closest enrolled ancestor. You may have to pay to order these from the state. In the end, we can only give you a general idea of requirements, the tribal enrollment office makes the final decision, so it is highly recommended to work closely with them while you prepare your application.

  11. My paternal grandmother was full blood. Lived in Dumas, Mississippi. Her name is Ollie Mae Bullock.

    I also have relatives listed on the Dawes Rolls. My maternal grandmother was also part Cherokee. Our name on the Dawes Rolls was Johns or Jons. Her name is Mabel Mille. Grandpa Stark may also have a degree of native blood. His full name is John Lester Stark. Misspell above, Mable Miller. This family history goes back a long way. Daddy was a halfbreed, I’m his only child. He’s listed as white on my Birth Certificate and I fully realize that at one time it wasn’t safe to list true blood. I worked for several years to piece my family but lost all information to a computer crash. I don’t know where to go from here. I live relatively close to the NC Reservation. Any help will be greatly appreciated.

  12. Hi my gma doesnt know and wont look through packed up boxes and lives in Oklahoma. I’m in arkansas and cant get to her. I dont want to pay to connect the family tree to figure out names and such to be able to apply. I am 1/8 Cherokee. Please help me.

  13. Hi, we are sorry for your difficult situation. There are several family tree building resources that you could use to get started. You might consider getting a subscription to Ancestry.com or use the free service FamilySearch.org. Since your grandma will not look through packed boxes you could ask her to at least tell you the names of the parents or grandparents which were Native American. Your grandma or grandpa’s parents were likely included in some of the censuses between 1920 and 1940, so you could start by looking in the 1940 United States Census on Ancestry or FamilySearch. Both Ancestry and FamilySearch are great tools for building your family trees based off of census records. Once you are back to the 1890s, which would only be one or two generations further back, you could look for the names of your ancestors in the Dawes Rolls. The Dawes Rolls can be searched at Ancestry.com, FamilySearch.org, or https://www.okhistory.org/research/dawes. Once you know the Dawes roll number, you can look up the specific nation in Oklahoma and fill out the application. We hope this was helpful as you consider how to move forward.

  14. Hi, thank you for your request. If you are wanting to apply for membership in the Cherokee Nation, the key will be to identify at least one ancestor on the Dawes Rolls. If you already know their names, then you can search the rolls at https://www.okhistory.org/research/dawes. Then, fill out the enrollment application including the ancestor’s roll number and birth and/or death certificates for each generation in between you and the ancestor. They have all the forms with detailed instructions on their website https://www.cherokee.org/all-services/tribal-registration/. If you are wanting to rebuild your family tree and regather the information you lost, we would be happy to help you in the process. We have sent you a direct email, in case you would like to follow up.

  15. So, I have a tricky situation. I am approximately 25% Cherokee, but things get a little hazy because of my father (where the bloodline mostly comes from). He sadly does not know who his dad is. Doesn’t know his name, where he is now, etc. If he did, I would be able to research my line a little better. I wanted to apply to a tribe and get more in touch with my roots, but I don’t know where to even begin (It’s also extremely evident by my hair and face that I am of Native American descent)
    Thank you for your help.

  16. I am Cherokee and also live in Missouri and trying to register my youngest child. I called last week and they told me that you need to print and fill out the application for registration that is on their website for all of your children, send in their original birth certificates (they will send them back to you) and a copy of your CDIB and just on the safe side I’d send a copy of your ID or driver’s license. And you can mail it to them. They will process it that way. Hope this helps.

  17. Mr. Price,

    I have been told all my life that I am of Native American heritage, My Great-Great-Grandmother I believe but I’m not totally sure. Is there anyway that you can or will research this for me. Of course I will give me all of my details. O saw in one of the comments above that you offered to do the research for someone else. I am not lazy, I just do not know how to do it. My name is Lance Scheffer Alexander, I was born on July 31st, 1969 in Henderson Kentucky. My parents are Charles and Rita Alexander, my paternal grandparents are Mary and Roscoe Ellis Alexander, my maternal grandparents are Amberson D. (A.D.) and Lois Scheffer and my maternal great grandparents were Oscar Lee Ray and Pearl Ray. Unfortunately, that’s as far back as I can remember. Any help you can give me with my Native American genealogy would be greatly appreciated. Thank you so much. I look forward to hearing from you soon. Until then, take care.

    Sincerely and Respectfully,

    Lance Scheffer Alexander
    1085 Warburton Avenue
    #516
    Yonkers, New York 10701
    (917)535-6276

  18. Please help this is so very important tome to know my heritage and I have been told all my life that I am a proud Native American and now that technology exists to verify it I want to know for sure because no one would be as proud as me to be a Native American and work towards the causes and rights that our people have been denied for so long.

  19. Hello, I have given your information to our staff and someone should be contacting you about the possibility of performing research for your family lines. Good Luck!
    Regards,
    Beth

  20. This is a good start for research! I have forwarded this information on to our staff who will be contacting you soon. If you don’t hear within a week, try calling at this number:
    801-571-6122 during the hours of 9-5, Mountain standard time.
    Thank you!
    Beth

  21. Are you referring to DNA testing? If so, Ancestry.com offers kits to purchase, as do other companies. Good Luck!

  22. Hi Ariel,
    The first order of business is to see if your father will submit to a DNA test, which could help determine where to head to research your ancestral lines. The application requirements into the Cherokee nation are fairly specific. We recommend looking up the CIBD application packet on the Cherokee Nation’s website. Go to https://www.cherokee.org/all-services/tribal-registration/, click on downloadable forms and print out the “Cherokee Nation CIDB Application Packet.” You will want to read it very carefully. Also, consider calling the Tribal enrollment office, just to double check that you got to the right form. You never know when an online form might have become outdated.
    Based on the instructions, you only need to have concrete proof back to an enrolled ancestor with a citizenship number. So if your father, grandfather, or great-grandfather ever was a citizen of the Cherokee nation, you only need to document back to them. The Application packet states that you have to have your birth certificate and either birth or death certificates for each person back to the closest enrolled ancestor. You may have to pay to order these from the state. In the end, we can only give you a general idea of requirements, the tribal enrollment office makes the final decision, so it is highly recommended to work closely with them while you prepare your application.
    Good Luck!

  23. Hi. My wife is 1/4 her dad 1/2 and grandpa and great grandpa is full Cherokee, she remembers her great grandpa wearing his buckskin clothes, but we don’t know if they’re listed, her grandpa name was Freed Middleton, don’t know her great grandpa name. Both her parents are gone now so we don’t have any other information, thank you, Frank

  24. Hi Frank, thanks for checking in! It sounds like some research is in order to determine more pertinent information about your wife’s family. You can reach us by phone at (801) 571-6122 and talk to one of our researchers to start the process of pinning down the ancestors. Testing DNA can also help determine where to head for research if the details about family members are vague, but the application requirements into the Cherokee nation are fairly specific. We recommend looking up the CIBD application packet on the Cherokee Nation’s website. Go to https://www.cherokee.org/all-services/tribal-registration/, click on downloadable forms and print out the “Cherokee Nation CIDB Application Packet.” You will want to read it very carefully. Also, consider calling the Tribal enrollment office, just to double check that you got to the right form. You never know when an online form might have become outdated.
    Based on the instructions, you only need to have concrete proof back to an enrolled ancestor with a citizenship number. So if your father, grandfather, or great-grandfather ever was a citizen of the Cherokee nation, you only need to document back to them. The Application packet states that you have to have your birth certificate and either birth or death certificates for each person back to the closest enrolled ancestor. You may have to pay to order these from the state. In the end, we can only give you a general idea of requirements, the tribal enrollment office makes the final decision, so it is highly recommended to work closely with them while you prepare your application.
    Good Luck!

  25. The application requirements into the Cherokee nation are fairly specific. We recommend looking up the CIBD application packet on the Cherokee Nation’s website. Go to https://www.cherokee.org/all-services/tribal-registration/, click on downloadable forms and print out the “Cherokee Nation CIDB Application Packet.” You will want to read it very carefully. Also, consider calling the Tribal enrollment office, to confirm the online form is up to date. Based on the instructions, you only need to have concrete proof back to an enrolled ancestor with a citizenship number. So if your father, grandfather, or great-grandfather ever was a citizen of the Cherokee nation, you only need to document back to them. Good Luck!

  26. How much does it cost for you to assist in researching?
    I found out two years ago my dad isn’t my biological father and I have researched back to the 5th grandparent and found Mary Elizabeth Robertson Dawes roll number 5022 as an ancestor,4th grandmother .can one of your researchers help me confirm this.
    Dona Hadley
    9188159280
    donabellar70@gmail.com

  27. Thank you for your comment, I think one of our researchers reached out to you and spoke with you on the phone.

  28. Thank you for helping this man find my birth rite and for helping this man get my great grand parents Sam and Belle Starr and pearl home to rest in Oaklahoma on our reservation my tribe the Cherokee nation I love you my native family LoveAndFamily that’s what I got it all for LiyaltyIsRoyalty Truth I found my princess my Queen my Wife to be Jordan Nachelle Magdaleno Brakket I love her my soulmate marriage kids happiness and true love

  29. I want to know if I can apply for membership with the Cherokee Nation. My uncle, who is my cousin’s dad is America Native Maya from Mexico met and married her mother, a registered Cherokee with the Cherokee nation. I believe her name was Connie Smith. All of my cousins from my America Native Maya uncle’s marriage to Connie Smith are registered as Cherokee natives. Do I qualify for and apply for membership to be included in the Cherokee Nation?

  30. Hello Primo,
    The application requirements into the Cherokee nation are fairly specific. We recommend looking up the CIBD application packet on the Cherokee Nation’s website. Go to https://www.cherokee.org/all-services/tribal-registration/, click on downloadable forms and print out the “Cherokee Nation CIDB Application Packet.” You will want to read it very carefully. Also, consider calling the Tribal enrollment office, to confirm the online form is up to date. Based on the instructions, you only need to have concrete proof back to an enrolled ancestor with a citizenship number. So if your father, grandfather, or great-grandfather ever was a citizen of the Cherokee nation, you only need to document back to them. I am not sure about married-in relations, that’s where you need to look at the application. Good Luck!

  31. You don’t give blood but a DNA 🧬 Swab. Hence, the swab will be used to associate your DNA with others for proof of connection

  32. Sir, thank you for helping people with your pithy advice. I found after getting my application back marked incomplete, that, indeed, the cherokee site had changed with updated details of requirements. My grandparents are on the dawes rolls, my brother and sisters are registered cherokee citizens, as are half of my relatives, so you would not think it would be too difficult.

  33. I have Cherokee and my family has their Dawes Roll number. I have the Indian bloodline on my Father’s side, however, my Father abandoned me and my two sisters when we were young, and we don’t have contact with him. Years ago I wanted to apply but I looked at my birth certificate and he did not sign it. Me and my twin sister was given my Father’s last name when we were born, but my mother had a different last name on the birth certificate because they were not married at the time. My twin sister has taken DNA test through Ancestry, and we have located our Great Grandfather who is a registered Cherokee Indian. I don’t know how this information can be used, when my birth certificate doesn’t have my Father’s name. So is there any advice on what I should do? I would appreciate it!

  34. Hello, I have been researching my family tree few a few years and had no idea I had any Cherokee ancestry. I am mostly of scotch-irish and some german lineage. But I got on Ancestry.com and summited a DNA sample on the site and I found out I have some Cherokee ancestry on my Fathers and Mom’s side with some Creek indian on my moms lineage.
    I know their names and a little about them. My father’s side has a stem lineage from Cheif Attakullakulla 1708-1777 my 5th ggf., father of Margaret Jane “Noisy Water” Attakullakulla 1788-1872, mother of Isabella Holt Setzer 1811-1897, mother of John Rufus McCall 1845-1899 who was in the Civil War.
    My mother’s side stems from William Moore Fields and Elisabeth Terrell parents of Hiram L. Fields 1763-1863, married to Francis Mays 1769-1851. I have found some of these on the Dawls rolls.

    Would I be able to apply for tribal membership?

  35. This sounds like a difficult obstacle. After looking at some of the information on the website for the Cherokee nation it seems very important to verify the Cherokee blood by using documents. You may be able to ask your mother to help you “redo” your birth certificate by making a legal delayed birth certificate to rectify the problem of your father’s name being omitted from your birth certificate. If your great-grandfather’s name is listed on the Dawes roles, and was 4/4 blood quantum (full blooded) Cherokee, you would be 1/4 blood quantum, meaning you would be eligible to be accepted into the tribe. My advice to you would be to get on the website for application into the tribe and look at the different requirements to apply. By the way, here is the information directly from the website about DNA: “DNA results, family photos, and resources found through genealogy websites are not valid proof of ancestry and cannot be used to verify citizenship.” Here is the link:
    https://www.cherokee.org/all-services/tribal-registration/downloadable-forms/
    There is a tab on the webiste you can select to contact the tribal services, and you could possibly get further direction from them. Besides your own original birth certificate, you will need the original certificate of your father and grandfather as well to prove lineage. Good luck!

  36. Hi John, here is what I found on the Cherokee Nation Tribal Registry website:
    “Each person listed on the Dawes Rolls of Cherokees by Blood was assigned a blood quantum fraction to express their amount of Cherokee ancestry. Blood quantums begin at 4/4 and divide in half with each successive generation. Your blood quantum will be computed and placed on your CDIB. If you do not have a CDIB, you will not have a blood quantum. CDIB is a Certificate of Degree of Indian Blood. DNA results, family photos, and resources found through genealogy websites are not valid proof of ancestry and cannot be used to verify citizenship.”

    The application requirements into the Cherokee nation are fairly specific. We recommend looking up the CIBD application packet on the Cherokee Nation’s website. Go to https://www.cherokee.org/all-services/tribal-registration/, click on downloadable forms and print out the “Cherokee Nation CIDB Application Packet.” You will want to read it very carefully. Also, consider calling the Tribal enrollment office, to confirm the online form is up to date. Based on the instructions, you need to have concrete proof back to an enrolled ancestor with a citizenship number. So if your father, grandfather, or great-grandfather ever was a citizen of the Cherokee nation, you only need to document back to them.
    If you need some help in verifying your family ancestral lines, we are here to help: Here are some numbers: 801-571-6122 Email: http://www.lineages.com

  37. Hi i am registered with the Cherokee, In August of last year i sent my forms off to get a duplicate copy, i called 3 weeks ago and they said they mailed it that very day and i still have not received it and i am in college and really need my role number so i can stay in school. Is there any way to get that number while i wait on my cards or how do i see were they went its been since the 9 th of Feb they were mailed.

  38. That sounds like a real problem! We don’t really have a way to assist you in getting your number. When you talked to the Cherokee Nation representative, did you explain the time sensitivity of the situation and that receiving your membership number was essential to stay in school? I think your best bet would be to make another call. I am surprised your things still have not come in the mail. They must have backups on their end and certainly they can give you the number from their records, especially if they had already mailed your forms back to you.
    Good Luck with this challenge!

  39. Hi I am adopted and my birth father is cherokee and is a tribal member. I have applied for my original birth certificate and received it yesterday…. but his name is not listed on in. My birth mom did not list him. I know who he is and know he is a tribal member. Is there any way for me to get tribal membership now? What do I need to do to prove it since his name is not on the birth certificate? Any help would be greatly appreicated …. I am at a loss now. I would love to have it for my 2 boys to have their true heritage. Thanks

  40. Hi Jennifer,
    This sounds like a real challenge! I wonder if you contacted the Cherokee Nation and explained what has happened and see if they have any way to get past this obstacle. Here is a link to their website on the contact page: https://www.cherokee.org/contact-us
    It may be possible to apply for a delayed birth certificate and in the application have your mother verify the name of your father. The requirements vary from state to state, so to find out what you should do for where you live (or were born) you could Google the topic “Delayed Birth Certificate” and see what you need to recreate your certificate. It may involve some affidavits from one or both of your parents.
    Good Luck! We hope for your success.

  41. So I have always always heard that our family had Native American. On both my moms and dads side. I’m waiting on my dna results with dna constants that run and Native American dna test.

    Today I traced Native American great grandparents aways back… I found where they were (NN) not known Native American to the Cherokee tribe. Who had a daughter and when she was two they were killed in the the Chickamauga wars in 1776. Then the daughter was adopted. Instead of going on the trail of tears they kept her. I then found where family members so more great grandparents had been in rolled in the Dawes rolls…. Is there a way I could apply for Cherokee. I have it traced back on my dads side from the full blooded Cherokee down the line to me. Then my sons definitely have Native American we are looking into that further but their dad has a lot of Native American. Any info would help and is so interesting

  42. Hi Samantha,
    Your story is very riveting! You might be surprised to discover how many other individuals like yourself are wondering about their ancestral family and what chance they have to be admitted into the Cherokee Tribe. Here is some information that may help answer your questions, including the one about DNA; I found this on the Cherokee Nation Tribal Registry website:
    “Each person listed on the Dawes Rolls of Cherokees by Blood was assigned a blood quantum fraction to express their amount of Cherokee ancestry. Blood quantums begin at 4/4 and divide in half with each successive generation. Your blood quantum will be computed and placed on your CDIB. If you do not have a CDIB, you will not have a blood quantum. CDIB is a Certificate of Degree of Indian Blood. DNA results, family photos, and resources found through genealogy websites are not valid proof of ancestry and cannot be used to verify citizenship.”

    The application requirements into the Cherokee nation are fairly specific. We recommend looking up the CIBD application packet on the Cherokee Nation’s website. Go to https://www.cherokee.org/all-services/tribal-registration/, click on downloadable forms and print out the “Cherokee Nation CIDB Application Packet.” You will want to read it very carefully. Also, consider calling the Tribal enrollment office, to confirm the online form is up to date. Based on the instructions, you need to have concrete proof back to an enrolled ancestor with a citizenship number. So if your father, grandfather, or great-grandfather ever was a citizen of the Cherokee nation, you only need to document back to them.
    If you need any more help in verifying your family ancestral lines, we are here to help: Here are some numbers: 801-571-6122 Email: http://www.lineages.com
    Good Luck!

  43. My fiancé his father has his Indian card but he isn’t on his birth certificate and his grandmother was Indian as well and we do have his fathers roll number what do we do ?

  44. Hi Jada,
    The application requirements into the Cherokee nation are fairly specific. We recommend looking up the CIBD application packet on the Cherokee Nation’s website. Go to https://www.cherokee.org/all-services/tribal-registration/, click on downloadable forms and print out the “Cherokee Nation CIDB Application Packet.” You will want to read it very carefully. Also, consider calling the Tribal enrollment office, to confirm the online form is up to date. Based on the instructions, you need to have concrete proof back to an enrolled ancestor with a citizenship number. So if your father, grandfather, or great-grandfather ever was a citizen of the Cherokee nation, you only need to document back to them.
    The fact that your fiancé’s father is not listed on his birth certificate may be remedied by applying for a delayed birth certificate through the state in which you live at the present time. Search “delayed birth certificate” on the internet and you should be able to find the requirements for your state to accomplish this.

    Good Luck!
    If you need any more help in verifying your family ancestral lines, we are here to help: Here is a number: 801-571-6122 Email: http://www.lineages.com

  45. My ancestor that is listed on the Dawes rolls for the Cherokee Nation he was born between 1837 and 1840, there’s some discrepancy as to the exact year, he was born in Marion Kentucky and when I called the vital statistics they told me I had to check with the historical society, the historical society told me that there had been a fire that had damaged or destroyed pretty much all the records previous to 1851. So how do you go about proving your relationship to that person if you need a birth certificate for that person? I can prove my lineage to him but I can’t provide a birth certificate or record for him.

  46. What if you can prove your lineage from your 2nd great grandparents both of whom where on the rolls and you have the numbers but you live in another state. Can you still be added to the tribe?
    2nd Great grandfather 1/16 2nd great-grandmother I believe is 100%
    I have to find the roll she is on. She was registered when she was 4 years old and was born in 1881.

  47. Hi Lisa,
    Have you asked someone from the Cherokee Nation this question? Here is their phone number: 918-453-5058. Hopefully they have a solution.
    If you need help with finding documents to verify your lineage, we are here to help. 801-571-6122 Email: http://www.lineages.com

  48. Hi James,
    Have you asked someone from the Cherokee Nation this question? Here is their phone number: 918-453-5058. Hopefully they have a solution.
    If you need help with finding documents to verify your lineage, we are here to help. 801-571-6122 Email: http://www.lineages.com
    Good Luck with your challenge!

  49. I have submitted everything required to get my children’s roll numbers. The place told me the re are 4 phases in the process, and my children’s are on phase two. Do you know what the phases are. Im curious to know how much longer it might take?

  50. Chris,
    Sorry but we are not that familiar with the four phases. We checked the Frequently Asked Questions portion of the website and someone asked, “How long does the process take for new applications for Cherokee nation citizenship?” and the answer was “Processing time varies.” Another source, Anthony Beaver, an enrollment specialist at the Muscogee (Creek) Nation Citizenship Office was quoted as saying 6-8 weeks. On the website there is a banner that says: “Cherokee Nation Registration is now processing Fall 2021 tribal citizenship applications. Check here for continual updates.”
    Good luck!

  51. Hi! My grgrandfather was on the Dawes for nearly a century but later his membership was overturned. He does have a number. I am searching the Dawes on Ancestry.com trying to locate his information, find what caused the overturn, see
    if anything can remedy this and possibly apply for membership.
    My family has several Coles in the tribe but, unfortunately, not of direct lineage. ( cousins removed)
    Questions: What causes a case to be overturned? Will his file still be on the Dawes even though his was overturned? Is there a collection of overturned files or a better way of searching for the information.
    Thank you for your time

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